Food Coloring Can Add A New Shade Of Deliciousness To A Restaurant Menu

It is no secret that food has to be visually appealing in order for us to want to consume it. Squid tentacles could be the most delicious meal in the world, but many people are discouraged by the slimy complexion and dark colors of the seafood. Ever wonder why fruits and vegetables all look so bright at supermarkets? That is because manufacturers breed tomatoes to be the reddest red, bananas to be uniform in shape and even lettuce nice and green. If a restaurant wants to add a little unique flair to a dish, chefs might consider using food coloring to accomplish this goal.

For example, the recent holiday of St. Patrick's day is the perfect time to implement the color green. Chefs can use restaurant equipment like the Garland US Range S684 to bake and cook food that has food coloring incorporated into it. Food coloring should always be added before cooking to ensure uniform color throughout the mixture - for instance, green dye should be swirled with cupcake batter before baking rather than drizzled on top of the finished product.


The only thing to remember is not to go overboard - too much food coloring can lead to a dark, messy final product that will not be very appealing to customers. A few drops will normally be sufficient to dye most dough or batter batches.